The French Play: Exploring Theatre "Re-Creatively" with Foreign Language Students

By Les Essif | Go to book overview

APPENDIX G:
SAMPLE PROMOTIONAL MATERIALS AND METHODS

Sample Promotional Letter to Potential Spectators

28 February 2000

Dear Students and Teachers of French, Francophones, Francophiles, and Theatrophiles:

Ça y est! The theatre company LES TRAVELLING UBU, of the UTK Department of Modern Foreign Languages, will be performing Pêre Ubu: Roi de nulle part at the Wesley Center (on campus, near the International House and Hodges Library, at 1718 Melrose Pl.) at the following times: Wednesday, April 12 at 4:30 p.m., Thursday, April 13 at 8:00 p.m., and Friday, April 24 at 4:30 p.m. Running time is approximately one hour.

This year, we will again have the pleasure of performing the play “on the road” at Powell High School (Wednesday, April 19), at Austin-East High School (Tuesday, April 25), and at Cleveland State Community College (Thursday, April 27). Students from other area high schools and middle schools will travel to Powell and Austin-East to see the show. Thank you Saralee Peccolo-Taylor, Korey Dugger, Diane Changas, and Catherine Smith for your interest and your organizational efforts.

Our play is based on Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi, a late-nineteenth-century “absurdist” type play. It's the story of the gluttonous, greedy, ignorant, deceitful Père Ubu, who, coaxed by his “charming” wife (Mère Ubu!), slaughters the royal family and takes over the throne of Poland (“Nulle Part”). He immediately massacres the Polish hierarchy and squeezes his subjects for every rixdale they've got. But then, on fait la GUERRE, and the legitimate successor to the throne, Bougrelas, defeats the Ubu couple, who flee toward another “nulle part” (France).

Our re-created version of this play will be presented primarily in French, with some English narration. As always, our goal is to find the best combination of image, action, narration, dialogue, sound, and audience participation to tell our story to French and theatre aficionados at

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