Writing Performance Reviews: A Write It Well Guide; How to Write Performance Objectives, Reviews, Appraisals, and Other Performance Documentation That Is Clear, Descriptive, Objective, and Acceptable in Today's Workplace

By Natasha Terk | Go to book overview

4
EXPLAINING AND SUPPORTING
EVALUATIONS AND DECISIONS

THINK ABOUT IT …

If you were a Human Resources Manager, what questions would you have about this
statement?

Jill is an asset to the department. She should be promoted to
section leader as soon as possible.

By its very nature, an evaluation is an opinion or conclusion. But it is an opinion or conclusion that is based on fact. To use the performance management process to help employees improve their performance, your evaluation must be based upon a set of observable and measurable facts and you must communicate them clearly, both verbally and in writing.

When you evaluate an employee's performance, you must first consider behavior and results that you have observed and/or measured. It is the conclusions you draw from the facts that lead to specific decisions and actions.

Sometimes performance results are determined by what didn't happen. For example…

Alex and his team were responsible for updating our e-mail and calendaring system this year. One of the key metrics used to determine the success of this project on the user side was number of calls to the Information Technology help desk during the three-month period following the rollout of the update. Historical data has shown that following a major update, the help desk experiences a 20 percent call increase related to the software involved in the update. Following this update, calls to the help desk related to e-mail and calendaring actually decreased by 10 percent. Alex's team's preparation and training in advance of the update clearly resulted in a lower incidence of help desk calls.

The documents you write must not only communicate your conclusions but include the details that clearly support those conclusions.

-57-

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Writing Performance Reviews: A Write It Well Guide; How to Write Performance Objectives, Reviews, Appraisals, and Other Performance Documentation That Is Clear, Descriptive, Objective, and Acceptable in Today's Workplace
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Writing Performance Objectives and Standards 9
  • 2: Criteria for Acceptable Performance Documentation 35
  • 3: Using Descriptive Language 45
  • 4: Explaining and Supporting Evaluations and Decisions 57
  • 5: Writing Descriptions That Are Specific and Complete 71
  • Program Review 97
  • Sample Documentation for Practice 106
  • Focus on Your Development 113
  • Action Planning 114
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