Contentious Spirits: Religion in Korean American History, 1903-1945

By David K. Yoo | Go to book overview

ASIAN AMERICA

A series edited by Gordon H. Chang

The increasing size and diversity of the Asian American population, its growing significance in American society and culture, and the expanded appreciation, both popular and scholarly, of the importance of Asian Americans in the country's present and past—all these developments have converged to stimulate wide interest in scholarly work on topics related to the Asian American experience. The general recognition of the pivotal role that race and ethnicity have played in American life, and in relations between the United States and other countries, has also fostered this heightened attention.

Although Asian Americans were a subject of serious inquiry in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, they were subsequently ignored by the mainstream scholarly community for several decades. In recent years, however, this neglect has ended, with an increasing number of writers examining a good many aspects of Asian American life and culture. Moreover, many students of American society are recognizing that the study of issues related to Asian America speaks to, and may be essential for, many current discussions on the part of the informed public and various scholarly communities.

The Stanford series on Asian America seeks to address these interests. The series will include works from the humanities and social sciences, including history, anthropology, political science, American studies, law, literary criticism, sociology, and interdisciplinary and policy studies.

A full list of titles in the Asian America series can be found online at www.sup.org/asianamerica

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Contentious Spirits: Religion in Korean American History, 1903-1945
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Asian America iii
  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • One - God's Chosŏn People 17
  • Two - Paradise Bound 34
  • Three - Practicing Religious Nationalism 58
  • Four - City of Angels 83
  • Five - Enduring Faith 107
  • Six - Voices in the Wilderness: the Korean Student Bulletin 130
  • Epilogue 153
  • Notes 159
  • Bibliography 196
  • Index 211
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