Politics, Philosophy, and Empire in the Fourth Century: Select Orations of Themistius

By Themistius; Peter Heather et al. | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHY

NOTES ON PRIMARY SOURCES

Themistius

There are two main editions of the speeches of Themistius. Up to the 1960s, the standard edition was W. Dindorf, ed., Themistii Orationes (Leipzig, 1832). This includes the Petavius-Harduinus annotations (Orr. 1–33) and the notes to Or. 34 from A. Mai's edition of 1816. It has now been largely superseded by the Teubner edition of H. Schenkl, G. Downey, and A. F. Norman, eds., Themistii Orationes, 3 vols (Leipzig, 1965–74). Themistius' extant paraphrases of various works of Aristotle can be found in M. Wallies et al., eds., Commentaria in Aristotelem Graeca, vol. 5 (Berlin, 1899–1900).

For translations of some or all of the speeches into modern languages, see Downey, 1958 (Or. 1 into English), Heather and Matthews, 1991, ch. 2 (part of Or. 8 and all of Or. 10 in English translation), Kesters, 1959 (Or. 26 into French), Leppin and Portmann, 1998 (German translation of Orr. 1–19), Maisano, 1995 (complete Italian translation), Penella, 2000 (Orr. 17 and 20–34 into English, together with The Letter of Constantius), and Schneider, 1966 (Or. 34 in German). Themistius' paraphrase of Aristotle, On the Soul has been translated by Todd, 1996.


Secular Texts

The non-Christian Classical sources cited by Themistius and discussed in the introductions and annotations can be consulted in the standard Classical series, most notably Oxford Classical Texts, Teubner, and Bude. Fragments of Greek tragedy are cited from Tragicorum Graecorumfragmenta. Where different standard editions have adopted different principles of organisation, as is the case with Aesop's Fables, we cite both. Many translations of these texts into English are available. The Loeb series is generally excellent, a smaller range is available in Penguin Classics, and we would particularly recommend the on-going Aris and Phillips editions of Euripides. Many late antique texts from the Latin west

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Politics, Philosophy, and Empire in the Fourth Century: Select Orations of Themistius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Translated Texts for Historians i
  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • Abbreviations viii
  • Preface ix
  • Chapter 1: Orator, Emperor, and Senate 1
  • Chapter 2: Themistius and Constantius 43
  • Chapter 3: After Julian 137
  • Chapter 4: Theodosius, Gratian, and the Goths 199
  • Chapter 5: Philosopher Prefect 285
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 1 349
  • Index 2 357
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