The Values Campaign? The Christian Right and the 2004 Elections

By John C. Green; Mark J. Rozell et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
Oklahoma
A Battle of Good versus Evil

SHAD B.SATTERTHWAITE

THE 2004 ELECTIONS WERE TOUTED AS THE MOST IMPORTANT IN years. Analysts predicting large voter turnouts were not disappointed when polls closed on November 2. Oklahoma was no exception. With a heated race for the U.S. Senate and a ballot loaded with salient referenda issues, voters in the Sooner State had ample reason to go to the voting booths. Churchgoing voters were reminded from the pulpit to make their voices heard. For many, casting a vote was more than a civic duty—it was a moral imperative.

Campaigning in Tulsa in August 2004, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Tom Coburn said, “This is a battle for the culture of America, and I would describe it as a battle of good versus evil (Martindale 2004).” With moral issues such as the lottery, gaming, and gay marriage on the Oklahoma ballot, many voters probably agreed. Area churches and other organizations waging a values campaign led a charge to defeat several ballot measures. Despite the rhetoric and hard campaigning, however, not all conservative positions dominated when the polls had closed and the dust finally settled.

For decades most statewide and congressional offices were held by Democrats, who also controlled both houses in the legislature. This situation has reversed in the past decade; the majority of these offices now are held by Republicans. Oklahoma clearly has seen a shift in its electorate. Results from a poll conducted by the University of Oklahoma are indicative of these changes. Respondents were asked if they considered themselves Republican or Democrat. Overall, 43 percent considered themselves Republican and 41 percent identified as Democrats. The results are interesting in comparison with actual registration statistics, which show that 51 percent of registered voters are Democratic and only 38 percent are Republican (Casteel 2000).

-199-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Values Campaign? The Christian Right and the 2004 Elections
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 269

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.