Print Culture and the Medieval Author: Chaucer, Lydgate, and Their Books, 1473-1557

By Alexandra Gillespie | Go to book overview

3
Assembling Chaucer's Texts in Print,
1517 to 1532

It is in Troilus and Criseyde that Chaucer frames a literary text most clearly as a book—one instructed to

kis the steppes where as thow seest pace
Virgile, Ovide, Omer, Lucan, and Stace.

(Troilus, v. 1791–2)

The author of Troilus locates himself at the inception of a new vernacular tradition by divorcing his practices from native traditions of 'making' or even translating, and inviting comparison with classical traditions of 'poesye' (Troilus, v. 1789–90). He declares himself worthy to address the authors of the classical past. His little book, in however humble a guise, traverses the distance between their 'steppes' and his own.¹ Chaucer's envoy is, in this sense, an effort to contain or control the passage of the material text and ideas about that text. In the very next stanza of Troilus, the author expresses intense anxiety about the bibliographical future of his poem:

So prey I God that non myswrite the,
Ne the mysmetre for defaute of tonge;
And red wherso thow be, or elles songe,
That thow be understonde, God I biseche!

(Troilus, v. 1795–8)

1 Chaucer names many other Latin sources: Boethius, Dares Phrygius, Dictys of
Crete, Guido de Colonne, Seneca, Alanus de Insulis, Avicenna, and Galen among them.
He names Geoffrey of Monmouth in House of Fame (though this 'Gaufride', l. 1470,
may ironically echo his own name there, 'Geffrey', l. 729). He refers to Dante in The
Legend of Good Women and to Petrarch as a Latin source for The Canterbury Tales. By
contrast, he never mentions two very direct sources for his vernacular 'making': Machaut
or Boccaccio. For comment, see Cooper, 'Generic Variations on the Theme of Poetic
and Civil Authority'.

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Print Culture and the Medieval Author: Chaucer, Lydgate, and Their Books, 1473-1557
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 281

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.