Daughter of the Revolution: The Major Nonfiction Works of Pauline E. Hopkins

By Pauline E. Hopkins; Ira Dworkin | Go to book overview

One Scene from the Drama
of Early Days

Pauline E. Allen

The world is but a stage, and the men and women merely actors.1

So says Shakespeare, the great delineator of the passions of the human heart; and the record of the world as historically compiled fully attests the truth of the poet. No writer has yet been able to create such dramatic situations and soul stirring events; such heroes, sublime and god-like, in the sacrifice of all earthly joys, for the glory of their God, as the study of biblical history reveals.

The creation, the various lapses of time, with their attendant progression, the rise and fall of nations, the rise and fall of religious creeds, form the most powerful drama of any age.

The enterprising dramatist might divide these events into three main parts: Ancient or Early days, Mediaeval, and Modern days and these three into suitable scenes and [illegible] plays.

If this could be done, how majestic and grand, would the presentation be; the martyrs of other days, those lowly in spirit, but high in heart, would cluster around and draw inspiration from the hero, who uplifted on the cross, breathed His blessing upon us, and ascended into heaven, to comfort and encourage His own; and finally reappear in the last scene, and establish upon earth the kingdom of the true and tried.

But while we soliloquize, sweet weird music steals over our senses; a blending of the passions: duplicity, discord and evil triumph. But above these, clear and sweet, rises a strain that must be trustfulness and resignation. We bend eagerly forward, as the curtain of the past rises, and reveals a scene of unequalled splendor. Before us lies a magnificent city, built upon a plain; palaces, gardens and beautiful villas dot the landscape; on our right rises a massive structure, terrace above terrace, each almost buried in a luxuriant wilderness of flowers, trees and shrubs; up and up it seems to rise, until we rest our eyes on the last terrace, which seems a garden suspended in the air; gleams of statuary and the mists of fountains complete the enchanting picture. On the left, the river winds gracefully in and out the trees, the sun casts

1. Shakespeare, As You Like It, 2.7.147–148.

-7-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daughter of the Revolution: The Major Nonfiction Works of Pauline E. Hopkins
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 407

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.