Daughter of the Revolution: The Major Nonfiction Works of Pauline E. Hopkins

By Pauline E. Hopkins; Ira Dworkin | Go to book overview

VIII.
Educators (Concluded)

Ahalf-century or more ago among the earnest workers of the great city of Boston, counted with those of prominence and refinement, of open hospitality and culture, was the family of the Howards.

For many years they lived at the homestead on Poplar St., in the then aristocratic quarter of the old West End. The house, a four-story brick edifice, was well-kept, and differed in no one particular from its flourishing neighbors, albeit its owners were colored, and it was a most unusual thing to find a Negro family so charmingly located as were the Howards, in those days when the trials endured by the race to-day were but child's play by comparison with the terrible sufferings then imposed upon the entire race.

One of the sons of this family, Edwin Frederick, brought to his home as his loving wife, Joan Louise Turpin of New York. By her genial manners and sympathetic heart this lady soon made herself a valued member of the household, and a valued friend to a large circle among members of her own race, as well as that class of broad, liberal-minded lovers of humanity among whom may be numbered such revered names as Garrison, Sumner, Wilson, Phillips, Higginson, and Lydia Maria Child, for the Howard family was identified closely with the anti-slavery movement from its inception. Married in New York, the eldest daughter of Edwin and Joan Howard, Adeline Turpin, was born in that city, and claims it as her birthplace; while Dr. Edwin Clarence and Joan Imogen are a son and daughter who delight ever that almost under the shadow of the “gilded dome” of Massachusetts' capitol building, their infancy and early youth were passed.

All three, reared under the finest moral influences, amid surroundings tended to foster a taste for literature, science, and that which is in the highest degree aesthetic, it is not surprising that we find these representatives of an honest mother and a universally beloved father, shedding sunshine and light through a long experience of private and public usefulness, in a service for the betterment of the children of our race, and for the alleviation of the sufferings of mankind.

As a physician, a graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Howard is known as the senior and among the most skilful of the doctors of Philadelphia, Pa., a city where he has won his enviable professional reputation, and among whose people he is ever accorded every honor by the citizens at large and by the highest officials who administer the affairs of the Quaker city.

In early life, during a residence of five years on the “Dark Continent” he first evinced his tendency towards the medical profession. As an observer, and

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