Daughter of the Revolution: The Major Nonfiction Works of Pauline E. Hopkins

By Pauline E. Hopkins; Ira Dworkin | Go to book overview

Elijah William Smith:
A Colored Poet Of Early Days

Pauline E. Hopkins

In these early days of the Twentieth century, the complexion and racial characteristics of “the hill,” the time-honored West End residence of many a famous family of color in Massachusetts, have changed so greatly in ten years that even the ghosts of our friends of those early days must find it lonely traveling among the present unfamiliar scenes. Yet many familiar landmarks remain to cheer the old inhabitant who still clings to dear associations. Within a very few years we have had to see many precious buildings broken to bits and carted away to chaos. The old Hayden house and the Cooley house long stood in twin relationship, the beacon lights to many a fugitive from slavery. In the grand words of our poet in a glowing tribute to Lewis Hayden:

All his thoughts were for his people;
And for them he toiled; watched while they slept,
The tyrant foiled; and when the ready hand was
Called and the strong arm,
'Twas his to answer “Here am I,”
And shield them from all harm.

Hobnobbing with these two families was that of our poet, the Caesars, Rileys, J. J. Smiths, Mitchells, Ruffins, Grays, Wentworths, Bryants, Clarks and a host of other familiar names. But time and tide wait for no man; improvements have crept in and changed the former old-time homes. Many of the present heads of young Boston families helped to form the infant class of Father Grimes's popular church—the present Twelfth Baptist church—on Phillips street, which now seems unrecognizable in its spick-span newness; the old frequenters, too, have died off or dropped away, allured by the welcoming arms of the Episcopal church, whose mission of St. Augustine, near Cedar street, is one of the interesting new features of this neighborhood. Father Grimes's church was the church-home of Elijah Smith and family for many happy years.

On the other side of “the hill,” the old St. Paul edifice has done more than change its coat—it has changed religions, too, and now greets us as a Jewish synagogue. If brick and mortar can mourn—even stone possesses life—how many tears that venerable building must have shed over its fall from Christianity. On both sides of the hill, the footsteps of Elijah W. Smith are more

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Daughter of the Revolution: The Major Nonfiction Works of Pauline E. Hopkins
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 407

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.