CHAPTER
56

I feel that this award was not made to me as a man, but to my
work—a life's work in the agony and sweat of the human spirit,
not for glory and least of all for profit, but to create out of the
materials of the human spirit something which did not exist
before.

—“Address upon Receiving the
Nobel Prize for Literature,” ESPL (119)

FRIDAY, November 10, 1950, was a school day. With Estelle beside him, he drove Jill and Vicki to school. Jill would not hear the news until the principal called her out of class to tell her. Her father had planned to go fishing after he returned home, but it was not going to be that kind of a day.

Almost as soon as he was back at Rowan Oak, Phil Mullen phoned him. He had been asked to do the story for the Associated Press and he wanted to come out. Faulkner reluctantly agreed. Near the end of his questioning, Mullen said, “Bill, you're just not very excited over the award, are you? Don't you think much of it?” Faulkner answered slowly, his eyes sharp. “Well,” he said, “they gave it to Sinclair Lewis and Old China Hand Pearl Buck, and they passed over Theodore Dreiser and Sherwood Anderson.” Two hours later he walked into Mullen's office and slowly read the sheets of gray copy paper. He asked for only one correction. “Change that to I was a member of the RAF,” he said. “I did not see any service.”1

After picking up the mail he strolled home, chatting briefly with a few friends without any reference to the day's news. When Mac Reed went out to Rowan Oak, he found him in the pasture in the old jeep that pulled a lime-spreader behind it. Finally reaching the gate, Faulkner turned off the engine and came over. Mac said not a word but simply held out his hand. Faulkner gripped it hard. “Mac,” he said, “I still can't believe it.”2

He began his preparations for fishing, only to meet intense opposition from his family. The Nobel Foundation would surely call, and he had to

-525-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Faulkner: A Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Faulkner - A Biography *
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Chapter 1 3
  • Chapter 2 11
  • Chapter 3 20
  • Chapter 4 29
  • Chapter 5 38
  • Chapter 6 43
  • Chapter 7 57
  • Chapter 8 68
  • Chapter 9 75
  • Chapter 10 85
  • Chapter 11 93
  • Chapter 12 104
  • Chapter 13 110
  • Chapter 14 120
  • Chapter 15 126
  • Chapter 16 136
  • Chapter 17 148
  • Chapter 18 155
  • Chapter 19 168
  • Chapter 20 172
  • Chapter 21 178
  • Chapter 22 186
  • Chapter 23 191
  • Chapter 24 203
  • Chapter 25 209
  • Chapter 26 222
  • Chapter 27 232
  • Chapter 28 242
  • Chapter 29 258
  • Chapter 30 273
  • Chapter 31 284
  • Chapter 32 297
  • Chapter 33 304
  • Chapter 34 311
  • Chapter 35 322
  • Chapter 36 328
  • Chapter 37 337
  • Chapter 38 346
  • Chapter 39 354
  • Chapter 40 366
  • Chapter 41 377
  • Chapter 42 384
  • Chapter 43 394
  • Chapter 44 405
  • Chapter 45 416
  • Chapter 46 426
  • Chapter 47 435
  • Chapter 48 441
  • Chapter 49 453
  • Chapter 50 463
  • Chapter 51 470
  • Chapter 52 482
  • Chapter 53 490
  • Chapter 54 501
  • Chapter 55 513
  • Chapter 56 525
  • Chapter 57 537
  • Chapter 58 545
  • Chapter 59 554
  • Chapter 60 566
  • Chapter 61 580
  • Chapter 62 586
  • Chapter 63 601
  • Chapter 64 614
  • Chapter 65 632
  • Chapter 66 645
  • Chapter 67 656
  • Chapter 68 669
  • Chapter 69 682
  • Chapter 70 696
  • Chapter 71 707
  • Notes 719
  • Chronology 748
  • Genealogy 752
  • Acknowledgments 755
  • Index 757
  • About the Author 779
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 780

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.