Making American Boys: Boyology and the Feral Tale

By Kenneth B. Kidd | Go to book overview

1. Farming for Boys

Why Boys Leave the Farm

Why did you leave the farm, my lad?
Why did you bolt and leave your dad?
Why did you beat it off to town
And turn your poor old father down?
Thinkers of platform, pulpit, press,
Are wallowing in deep distress;
They seek to know the hidden cause
Why farmer boys desert their pas.
Some say they long to get a taste
Of faster life and social waste;
And some will say the silly chumps
Mistake their suit cards for their trumps
In wagering fresh and germless air
Against the smoky thoroughfare.
We're all agreed the farm's the place,
So free your mind and state your case.

Well, stranger, since you've been frank,
I'll roll aside the hazy bank,
The misty cloud of theories,
And tell you where the trouble lies.
I left my dad, his farm, his plow,
Because my calf became his cow.
I left my dad—'twas wrong, of course—
Because my colt became his horse.
I left my dad to sow and reap
Because my lamb became his sheep.
I dropped my hoe and stuck my fork
Because my pig became his pork.
The garden stuff that I made grow,
'Twas his to sell, but mine to hoe.
It is not the smoke in the atmosphere,
Nor the taste for life that brought me here.
Please tell the platform, pulpit, press,
No fear of toil or love of dress
Is driving off the farmer lads,
But just the method of their dads.

-23-

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Making American Boys: Boyology and the Feral Tale
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Boyology or Boy Analysis ii
  • Making American Boys - Boyology and the Feral Tale iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Boyhood for Beginners: An Introduction 1
  • 1. Farming for Boys 23
  • 2. Bad Boys and Men of Culture 49
  • 3. Wolf-Boys, Street Rats, and the Vanishing Sioux 87
  • 4. Father Falnagan's Boys Town 111
  • 5. from Freud's Wolf Man to Teen Wolf 135
  • 6. Reinventing the Boy Problem 167
  • Notes 191
  • Works Cited 221
  • Index 237
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