Surrounded: Palestinian Soldiers in the Israeli Military

By Rhoda Ann Kanaaneh | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

Earlier versions of a portion of the material in this chapter, as well as in Chapter 2, appeared in “Embattled Identities: Palestinian Soldiers in the Israeli Military,” Journal of Palestine Studies 32, no. 3 (Spring 2003): 5–20.

1. Batya Gur, “Dancing in the Dark,” Haaretz, February 8, 2002, Week's End.

2. A group of Israeli intellectuals and politicians filed a petition with the Israeli High Court demanding that the state allow them to be listed as “Israelis” on their identification cards. In response, the state prosecutor's office argued such an option “does not reflect, is not suitable and undermines the very principles under which the State of Israel was created.” See Yuval Yoaz, “State Refuses to Register 'Israeli' Nationality,” Haaretz, www.haaretz.com/hasen/objects/pages/PrintArticleEn.jhtml?itemNo=429149 (accessed February 14, 2008).

3. By law, all Israeli citizens are subject to conscription. It is the minister of defense who has complete discretion to grant an exemption to individual citizens or classes of citizens.

4. Part of Tel Aviv University is built on the remains and ruins of the village of Sheikh Muwannis. See Mark Levine, “Nationalism, Religion and Urban Politics in Israel: Struggles Over Modernity and Identity in 'Global' Jaffa,” in Mixed Towns, Trapped Communities: Historical Narratives, Spatial Dynamics, Gender Relations and Cultural Encounters in Palestinian-Israeli Towns, eds. Daniel Monterescu and Dan Rabinowitz (Hampshire, England: Ashgate, 2007), 298.

5. Ibid., 288, 299.

6. The derogatory term in Israel is ʿavodat ʿaravim.

7. With inferior prenatal health care, it could be argued that this process begins before birth.

8. See Raif Zureik's commentary on Palestinians asked to support “the rule of law, a law that in many cases was specially adapted in order to hurt me.” Raif Zureik, “The Unbearable Lightness of Enlightenment,” Adalah's Review (Politics, Identity and Law) 1 (Fall 1999): 7.

-133-

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Surrounded: Palestinian Soldiers in the Israeli Military
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and Islamic Societies and Cultures ii
  • Surrounded - Palestinian Soldiers in the Israeli Military iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1: Israel's Arabs 1
  • 2: Embattled Identities 9
  • 3: Conditional Citizenship 27
  • 4: Material Upgrade 35
  • 5: Military Ethnification 51
  • 6: The Limits of Being a Good Arab 61
  • 7: Broken Promises 69
  • 8: Boys or Men? Duped or “made”? 79
  • 9: Blood in the Same Mud 91
  • Afterword - Unsettling Methods 113
  • Reference Matter 127
  • Acknowledgments 129
  • Notes 133
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 203
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