Corridor Cultures: Mapping Student Resistance at an Urban High School

By Maryann Dickar | Go to book overview

QUALITATIVE STUDIES IN PSYCHOLOGY

This series showcases the power and possibility of qualitative work in psychology. Books feature detailed and vivid accounts of qualitative psychology research using a variety of methods, including participant observation and fieldwork, discursive and textual analyses, and critical cultural history. They probe vital issues of theory, implementation, interpretation, representation, and ethics that qualitative workers confront. The series mission is to enlarge and refine the repertoire of qualitative approaches to psychology.

General Editors

Michelle Fine and Jeanne Marecek

Everyday Courage: The Lives and Stories of Urban Teenagers

Niobe Way

Negotiating Consent in Psychotherapy

Patrick O'Neill

Flirting with Danger: Young Women's Reflections on Sexuality and Domination

Lynn M. Phillips

Voted Out: The Psychological Consequences of Anti-Gay Politics

Glenda M. Russell

Inner-City Kids: Adolescents Confront Life and Violence in an Urban Community

Alice McIntyre

From Subjects to Subjectivities: A Handbook of Interpretive and Participatory Methods

Edited by Deborah L. Tolman and Mary Brydon-Miller

Growing Up Girl: Psychosocial Explorations of Gender and Class

Valerie Walkerdine, Helen Lucey, and June Melody

Voicing Chicana Feminisms: Young Women Speak Out on Sexuality and Identity

Aida Hurtado

Situating Sadness: Women and Depression in Social Context

Edited by Janet M. Stoppard and Linda M. McMullen

Living Outside Mental Illness: Qualitative Studies of Recovery in Schizophrenia

Larry Davidson

Autism and the Myth of the Person Alone

Douglas Biklen, with Sue Rubin, Tito Rajarshi Mukhopadhyay, Lucy Blackman,
Larry Bissonnette, Alberto Frugone, Richard Attfield, and Jamie Burke

American Karma: Race, Culture, and Identity in the Indian Diaspora

Sunil Bhatia

Muslim American Youth: Understanding Hyphenated Identities through Multiple Methods

Selcuk R. Sirin and Michelle Fine

Pride in the Projects: Teens Building Identities in Urban Contexts

Nancy L. Deutsch

Corridor Cultures: Mapping Student Resistance at an Urban High School

Maryann Dickar

-ii-

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