The Political Economy of Japan's Low Fertility

By Frances McCall Rosenbluth | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Writing a book is always something of a communal process, given the many people who provide inspiration and input. This book, being an edited one, is explicitly so, and I first thank the authors, who participated in multiple workshops and grappled collectively to generate the ideas we present here. The chapter authors represent several social science disciplines—political science, economics, and sociology—and it speaks to their engagement with the topic and to their intellectual generosity that we were able to cohere as a productive group. It was stimulating and challenging for all of us to try to think from someone else's disciplinary vantage point. As an astute reader may quickly grasp, we did not necessarily drop our own biases, but our chapters in combination undoubtedly provide a richer view than any one of us could have produced alone. I like to think that the volume has multifaceted “fly vision” of the kind that Carol Gluck advises historians to adopt. Along the way, we also benefited enormously from the comments and suggestions of discussants from several disciplines: Linda Edwards (economics), Nancy Folbre (economics), Siv Gustafsson (economics), Kimberly Morgan (political science), Kenneth Scheve (political science), Daniel Seldon (anthropology), Karen Shire (sociology), and David Weinstein (economics).

Without financial support, this intellectual process would not have been possible, and I wish to thank the Georg W. Leitner Program in International and Comparative Political Economy, the Yale Council of East Asian Studies, the Kempf Fund of the Yale Center for International and Area Studies, and the Yale Institute of Social and Policy Studies for their

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