Modern Dance, Negro Dance: Race in Motion

By Susan Manning | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book began from an offhand comment by Cynthia Jean Cohen Bull (aka Cyn thia Novack) on the “segregated historiography” of American dance. That was around 199o, before Cynthia became ill with the cancer that killed her in 1996. Although she read early essays toward this book, Cynthia never realized where her remark would lead me. I'm quite sure that she would not have told the story in the same way, yet I remain keenly grateful for her presence in my life and work.

The insights of many other colleagues in dance studies have marked this inquiry as well. For sharing research leads, conference podiums, and after-hours conversa tions I thank Valerie Briginshaw, Ramsay Burt, VèVè Clark, Susan Cook, Ann Daly, David Gere, Ellen Graff, Richard Green, Susan Foster, Thomas DeFrantz, Lynn Garafola, Brenda Dixon Gottschild, Constance Valis Hill, Jonathon David Jackson, Naomi Jackson, Tirza True Latimer, John Perpener, and Kate Ramsey. For reading the penultimate draft, Jane Desmond, Anthea Kraut, and Jacqueline Shea Murphy deserve a special round of thanks. The Society of Dance History Scholars provided me a place to grow up professionally; there Sally Banes and Linda Tomko ably served as presidents during my tenure on the board. More recently the American Studies Association has offered a fabulous venue for sharing my research, and I thank all my coconspirators in the formation of the Caucus on Performance in the Americas within the association.

At Northwestern University I feel fortunate in my manifold affiliation with the Department of English, the Department of Theatre and Program in Dance, the Department of Performance Studies, and the Program in American Studies. Susan Lee and Billy Siegenfeld have always understood why my passion for dance took me from the studio to the archive. Members of the faculty reading group on American

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Modern Dance, Negro Dance: Race in Motion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction: American Bodies in Motion xiii
  • 1. Danced Spirituals 1
  • 2. Dancing Left 57
  • 3. in the Shadow of War 115
  • 4. Blood Memories 179
  • Notes 223
  • Index 273
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