Undercover: How I Went from Company Man to FBI Spy--And Exposed the Worst Healthcare Fraud in U.S. History

By John W. Schilling | Go to book overview

Prologue

Tuesday, May 8, 1997 Fort Myers, Florida

He drove a dark, nondescript Chevy, its interior strewn with coffee cups and gum wrappers. The four-door sedan badly needed a wash, but I recognized it right away and slid into the front passenger seat. There on the floor lay a 10-millimeter Glock, snug in its brown leather holster. I grimaced and gingerly shifted my feet to avoid touching it. I adjusted the air-conditioning vent to find relief from the stifling tropical heat. The driver flashed me a reassuring grin and stepped on the accelerator as we sped out of the Wal-Mart parking lot. We were in Fort Myers, Florida, and today's mission was to tour each Southwest Florida site that would be targeted. I wondered why this was necessary, but my handler explained that in his experience, guessing only leads to mistakes. He obviously had a lot of experience.

Although the tourist season was over, the traffic was unusually slow for a Tuesday afternoon. The familiar flickering of red emergency lights indicated an accident scene ahead. After we maneuvered past the sheriff's squad cars at the crash site, we arrived at Gulf Coast Hospital, located at a busy intersection. Ford pulled the car into an empty space in the parking lot and produced a yellow legal notepad.

Then he said, “Tell me everything you know about these offices, John. Where are the executive offices and the financial documents?”

As I spoke, he drew small diagrams, mapping the layout of the admin-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Undercover: How I Went from Company Man to FBI Spy--And Exposed the Worst Healthcare Fraud in U.S. History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 288

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.