Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder

By Max Sherman | Go to book overview

UNSWERVING DEDICATION TO PRINCIPLE

ON OCTOBER 5, I995, THREE AND A HALF MONTHS BEFORE her death, Barbara Jordan received the Sylvanus Thayer Award presented by the Association of Graduates of the United States Military Academy. West Point describes the award this way:

[It is presented to] an outstanding citizen of the United States
whose service and accomplishments in the national interest ex-
emplify personal devotion to the ideals expressed in the West
Point motto, “Duty, Honor, Country.” The award is named in honor
of Sylvanus Thayer, Class of 1808, the thirty-third graduate of the
academy, who nine years later became its fifth superintendent.
Serving in this capacity until 1833, Thayer instituted at West Point
those principles of academic and military education, based upon
the integration of character and knowledge, which have remained
an essential element of the Military Academy11

The Sylvanus Thayer Award has been offered continuously since 1958. Some of those previously honored were Generals of the Army Dwight D. Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, and Omar N. Bradley; former Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush; Secretaries of State John Foster Dulles, Dean Rusk, Cyrus R. Vance, and George P. Shultz; Supreme Court Chief Justice Warren E. Burger; and a host of other outstanding citizens, such as Reverend Theodore M. Hesburgh, Clare Boothe Luce, Francis Cardinal Spellman, and Billy Graham. Barbara Jordan was in good company.

One line from the “1995 Sylvanus Thayer Award Citation” is worth emphasizing:

Through the eloquence ofheroratory, her relentless pursuit of equal

-77-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 112

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.