William McKinley and His America

By H. Wayne Morgan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 18
Making Peace

ONE HOT DAY in mid-August, Judge Day came to the white House on a pleasant mission; he was to resign as secretary of state. He could not resist joking with McKinley, for while they were somewhat formal together even as friends, both remembered calmer days at the Canton bar. Day laughed and told the president that he was sorry to leave him in midadministration, depriving him of priceless counsel. McKinley smiled and quipped: “Well, Judge Day, every change so far in the office of Secretary of State has been an improvement!”1

McKinley turned to John Hay as Day's successor. He was pleased with the ambassador's work in Britain before and during the war, and decided to have him in the cabinet's premier post. On August 15 he formally tendered the post, expecting a ready acceptance. But in England, Hay was not so eager. A curious mixture of indolence and ambition, he was not anxious to return to Washington. He enjoyed London. Furthermore, he hated the United States Senate, with which he inevitably would have to work as secretary of state. Henry White found him restive, but he “shouldered his pack” and accepted.2 McKinley prompdy frightened him, saying that he would not worry any longer about diplomatic details. The choice bespoke McKinley's growing awareness of foreign affairs. Hay's world travel, urbanity, intelligence, and diplomatic experience recommended him to the president. Hay's acceptance relieved him, though the ambassador did not take his post until September 30.

Selection of Hay's successor posed a knotty problem and a fascinating possibility. Could the president not send Senator Hoar to London as ambassador, removing the old man from the scene at a time when he had already betrayed disquieting symptoms of revolt against the president's policies? He sounded out the senator, whose innocent face hid one of the sharpest tongues in public life, and tendered him the appointment. But the hoar brushed it aside. He was too old and too poor. He had no intention of going abroad just when the choicest fight since Reconstruction loomed.3 McKinley's offer then went to a more logical choice, the rich, witty Joseph Choate of New York.

-303-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William McKinley and His America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.