William McKinley and His America

By H. Wayne Morgan | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 23
Epilogue

IDA MCKINLEY lived until 1907, spending six years in the isolation of her private world, pouring out her grief and loneliness to friends on heavy blackbordered paper. She spent much of every day in reverie over her husband and his accomplishments. All around her, objects evoked his presence in her solitary rooms. Often she rallied from her illness to be kindly, thoughtful, and interesting. But despite attending nieces and friends, time weighed heavily on her hands. “I realize more and more that I am not company for anyone but I do not wish to forget my friends,” she wrote plaintively to Webb Hayes. “I am more lonely every day I live.”1

When she died in Canton in 1907, Ohio and the nation that had perhaps passed her by mourned her sincerely, remembering with a touch of sad nostalgia her pride in sharing her husband's public life. She lived to see many honors accorded him. On a green hill in Canton's cemetery there arose a stately tomb that would house her remains along with his and the two small coffins of their children. In Niles, a many-pillared memorial combined utility with dignity to remind travelers and residents that a president came from those humble surroundings.

Ida McKinley did not question her husband's greatness or the magnitude of his accomplishments. To her they went without saying. At his death, McKinley was the subject of sincere eulogies, for he died the most widely beloved president in memory. “There have undoubtedly been greater and stronger Presidents than he was,” George McClellan Jr. would say, “but none was a more kindly nor a more courteous gentleman, and none has died more regretted by his countrymen, nor more beloved.”2

The years of his presidency were transitional. He stood as both the last traditional chief executive and as the first modern one, trying through his policies of conciliation to ease his country and his people into the new position their responsibilities demanded. His demeanor may have seemed traditional, but his legacy was modern. His successors used the latent powers of

-404-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William McKinley and His America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 488

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.