Who Are the Criminals? The Politics of Crime Policy from the Age of Roosevelt to the Age of Reagan

By John Hagan | Go to book overview

INDEX
Abacus. See Goldman Sachs
Abu Ghraib prison, 8, 245; and torture, 217–26, 256
adversarial framing. See boundary framing
AIG. See American International Group
Akayesu decision, 225, 240, 254
alcohol: and Center for Disease Control, 52; danger of, 48, 52; and immigrants, 32; and Prohibition, 18–20
Al Qaeda: and the Geneva Convention, 49–51, 219; and torture memo, 49–51
American International Group: bailout of, 204, 209; and derivatives, 188, 206
Amnesty International, and Abu Ghraib prison, 217
Anfal case, 224, 244, 246, 254–56
anomie theory, 71–72, 137, 162–65
Anti Drug Abuse Act of 1986, 157
Atrocities Documentation Survey, 236, 240
Aurora Loan Services. See Lehman Brothers
Balbus, Isaac. See conflict theory of ghetto revolts and courts, Balbus on
Bandura, Albert, and concept of selfefficacy, 131
Bank of America, 181; and Merrill Lynch, 193, 204
Bank of Credit and Commerce International, 176
“banksters,” 80, 178. See also Pecora, Ferdinand
Bashir, Omar al-: and Arab attacks on blacks, 237–43; and genocide, 240; and nation-states, 252; and use of racial epithets, 239–42
Bear Stearns, 167, 205–6; and mortgage debt, 202–3; and subprime loans, 191–92
Becker, Howard, on “outsiders,” 86–87
Berkeley. See University of California at Berkeley
Biden, Senator Joe, 135, 155; and sen tencing policy, 9, 138, 151, 155
Blankfein, Lloyd, 208; and AIG bailout, 209–10; and regulatory capture, 208–9
Blumstein, Alfred: and the criminal career paradigm, 16, 110–13; and lambda, 110; and the Project of Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods, 129–30; and Reagan's Presidential Advisory Board, 16–18; on vacancy chains from mass incarceration, 160
Boesky, Ivan, and insider trading, 173–76. See also Milken, Michael
boundary framing, and crime during the age of Reagan, 139–40, 164, 211–12
Bush, President George W.: and Reagan policies, 9; and war on terror, 214–21
Bush Doctrine, and war on terror, 216
California Department of Corrections, and new prisons, 162–63
capital disinvestment: during the age of Reagan, 126–29; and “deviance service centers,” 127; and Hagan and McCarthy on street youth, 126–29
career criminals. See Garland, David: on career criminals
Carter, President Jimmy, 11
CAT. See Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment
CDC. See California Department of Corrections
CDC. See Center for Disease Control
CDO. See collateralized debt obligation
Center for Global Justice report, 255–56

-293-

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