The Politics of Happiness: What Government Can Learn from the New Research on Well-Being

By Derek Bok | Go to book overview

NOTES

Introduction

1. Quoted in Vijay K. Shrotryia, “Happiness and Development: Public Policy Initiatives in the Kingdom of Bhutan,” in Yew-Kwang Ng and Lok Sang Ho (eds.), Happiness and Public Policy: Theory, Case Studies, and Implications (2006), pp. 193, 201.

2. See, e.g., Jigme Y. Thinley, “Gross National Happiness: A Paradigm for In- telligent Urbanism” (paper submitted at 3d International Conference on Gross National Happiness, Bangkok, Thailand, January 3–5, 2007); Brook Lerner, “Bhutan's Novel Experiment,” National Geographic (March 2008), p. 124.

3. Daniel Kaufman, Aart Kraay, and Massimo Mastruzzi, “Governance Mat- ters VI: Aggregate and Individual Governance Indicators 1996–2006,” World Bank Policy Research Working Paper 4280 (July 2007), pp. 76–93.

4. The treatment of Nepalis in Bhutan is described by Tessa Piper, “The Exodus of Ethnic Nepalis from Southern Bhutan,” 14 Refugee Survey Quarterly (1995), p. 52.

5. See, e.g., Vijay K. Shrotryia, note 1; Brook Lerner, note 2; Bob Frame, “Bhutan: A Review of Its Approach to Sustainable Development,” 15 Develop- ment in Practice (2005), p. 216.

6. See Raksha Arora, “A Weil-Being Report Card for President Sarkozy,” http:// www.gallup.com/poll/10 3795 /WellBeing-Report-Card-President-Sarkozy.aspx (January 17, 2008).

7. Nick Donovan and David Halpern, Life Satisfaction: The State of Knowl- edge and Implications for Government (2002). David Cameron is quoted in Rana Foroohar, “Money v. Happiness: Nations Rethink Priorities,” Newsweek (April 5, 2007), p. 3.

8. Darrin M. McMahon, Happiness: A History (2006), pp. 200–221.

9. Ibid., p. 261.

10. Jeremy Bentham, Introduction to the Principles of Morals and Legislation (J. H. Burns and H.L.A. Hart, eds., 1996), pp. 39–40.

11. Ibid., pp. 38–41.

12. See chapter 1 for further discussion.

13. Richard A. Easterlin, “Does Economic Growth Improve the Human Lot? Some Empirical Evidence,” in Paul A. David and Meivin W. Reder (eds.), Na- tions and Households in Economic Growth: Essays in Honor of Moses Abramo- witz (1974), p. 89; and Easterlin, “Feeding the Illusion of Happiness: A Reply to Hagerty and Veenhoven,” 74 Social Indicators Research (2005), p. 74.

-213-

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The Politics of Happiness: What Government Can Learn from the New Research on Well-Being
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: What Investigators Have Discovered 9
  • 2: The Reliability of Research on Happiness 32
  • 3: Should Policy-Makers Use Happiness Research? 45
  • 4: The Question of Growth 63
  • 5: What to Do about Inequality 79
  • 6: The Threat of Financial Hardship 99
  • 7: Relieving Suffering 124
  • 8: Marriages and Families 139
  • 9: Education 156
  • 10: The Quality of Government 179
  • 11: The Significance of Happiness Research 204
  • Notes 213
  • Index 247
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