Inventing the Israelite: Jewish Fiction in Nineteenth-Century France

By Maurice Samuels | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book speaks across the disciplines of French studies and Jewish studies. As a scholar trained in the former, I had much to learn about the latter. I therefore wish to thank all the colleagues who facilitated my education and welcomed me into the field with generosity and patience.

I began the project while teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, and the book bears the stamp of the dynamic scholarly community there. A grant from the Penn Research Foundation enabled me to undertake initial research in Paris, and the Gruss Fellowship at Penn's Center for Advanced Judaic Studies provided a stimulating forum to begin writing. I thank David Ruderman and the staff of the CAJS for their encouragement and support. The other fellows at the CAJS offered important guidance as I launched the project. John Pollack and Arthur Kiron from the Penn library went above and beyond to help me locate texts and images. David Stern, Beth Wenger, and the other members of the Jewish Studies faculty at Penn made me feel part of an exciting team. My sorely missed writing group at Penn—Barbara Fuchs, Kevin Platt, and Emily Steiner—helped me shape the project and were my first readers. Other colleagues in Philadelphia, especially Gerald and Ellen Prince, Michèle Richman, Jerome Singerman and Liliane Weissberg, Jacob Soll and Ellen Wayland-Smith, and the late Frank Bowman, shared their wisdom in memorable ways.

My move to Yale may have slowed the book down a bit, but it also made it better. I'm very grateful to my colleagues in the French Department at Yale, as well as in the university as a whole, for creating such a supportive working environment. Conversations with Ora Avni,

-vii-

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Inventing the Israelite: Jewish Fiction in Nineteenth-Century France
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction: Out of the Archive 1
  • One: Romantic Exoticism 37
  • Two: Between Realism and Idealism 74
  • Three: The Conservative Renegade 112
  • Four: Village Tales 154
  • Five: Ghetto Fiction 193
  • Conclusion: Proust's Progenitors 239
  • Notes 263
  • Index 315
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