Cultures of Servitude: Modernity, Domesticity, and Class in India

By Raka Ray; Seemin Qayum | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1

1. The 1956 film was based on the novel Aparajito (1931) by Bibhuti Bhushan Bandopadhyay.

2. “Mukhujje-ginni: Do you have anyone where you come from?

“Sarbajaya: I have no one.

“Mukhujje-ginni: Then there is no problem, you may as well come with us.”

Satyajit Ray, The Apu Trilogy, 76.

3. Ibid.

4. Sarkar, Hindu Wife, Hindu Nation; Davidoff, Worlds Between.

5. We emphasize here that this claim is not restricted to India but encompasses societies in which keeping servants has been significant over the longue durée. Indeed, as Carolyn Steedman shows, the great legal scholars of late eighteenth- and nineteenth-century England were well aware that the relationship between master and servant was of central importance. Steedman quotes Sir William Blackstone as asserting that the contract between employer and servant embodied the first of the three great relations of private life—the other two being between wife and husband and between parent and child. Most important, he claimed that the other two relationships were founded on this primary one. See Steedman, “Servant's Labour,” 8. On the importance of the institution of domestic servitude for understanding the logic of European household formation, see Laslett, World We Have Lost, and Laslett and Wall, Household and Family.

6. As scholarship on servants in early modern Europe and colonial India indicates, servanthood could be considered an occupation, a stage in the life cycle, and a social condition; moreover, Raffaella Sarti notes that “the history of domestic service is (partially) intertwined with the history of slavery,” making definitions of servants,

-201-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Cultures of Servitude: Modernity, Domesticity, and Class in India
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1: Approaching Servitude in Kolkata 1
  • 2: Colonial Legacies and Spatial Transformations 32
  • 3: Between Family Retainer and Freelancer 65
  • 4: Disquieting Transitions 92
  • 5: The Failure of Patriarchy 119
  • 6: The Cultivation and Cleavage of Distinction 145
  • 7: Traveling Cultures of Servitude 167
  • 8: Conclusion 188
  • Notes 201
  • Glossary 229
  • Bibliography 233
  • Index 249
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.