Faith in Schools: Religion, Education, and American Evangelicals in East Africa

By Amy Stambach | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1

1. Carter 1997; Kassimir 2001; Mundy 1998; author's conversations with American missionaries in Tanzania, June 2002. See also Hearn 2002 and Wade 2002.

2. Adas 2006: 397; Diouf 1997: 292–293; Escobar 1995: 163–167; J. Ferguson 2006: 71.

3. Marshall 2001; Wolfensohn and Carey 2001; USAID 2004.

4. Imam of the Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims. Born in Geneva, Switzerland; raised in Nairobi, Kenya; and educated at Harvard in the 1950s, the Aga Khan— or His Highness Prince Karim al-Hussayni—inherited the office of Imamate from his grandfather in 1957. He currently leads the Ismaili community worldwide.

5. World Faiths Development Dialogue, Development Dialogue, at http:// wbln0018.worldbank.org/developmentdialogue/developmentdialogueweb.nsf/ weblinks/YEON-5G4MTK?OpenDocument. See also “Serving the Poor in AfricaWorkshop with Christian Leaders: Talking Points for Mr. Callisto Madavo, Vice President, Africa Region, World Bank,” held in Nairobi, March 6, 2000, www .worldbank.org/afr/speeches/cm000306.htm.

6. http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/releases/2001/01/ 20010129-2.html

7. For examples of changing forms and points of western domination, see works by Adas (1989, 2006); Hardt and Negri (2001); Mastnak (2002); Scott (1998).

8. Among these organizations were the Freedom from Religion Society and Americans United for Separation of Church and State.

9. Field research, Uganda 2006. The comment “people without history” was an ironic twist on anthropologist Eric Wolf's 1983 book Europe and the People Without History, which argued that expansionist Europeans saw “other cultures” as existing in unchanging time and thus as “primitive” and “without history.” Ugandans returned the phrase, portraying Americans as primitive and unaware of the past.

10. I use public in three senses, to mean “popular,” “governmental,” and “open,” after Starrett (1998: 192). Throughout I draw on Birgit Meyer's astute analyses of religion, media, and the public sphere (Meyer 2004; Meyer and Moors 2006: 1–25); and on Ellis and Haar's (2005) discussion of religion and politics in Africa. In scope, this book represents an example of what Anna Tsing calls an “ethnography of global connections” (2005: xi). It describes the ideas, images, and interactions of a transnational community whose members share, in this particular case, a religious view that reflects historical and cultural heterogeneity.

-199-

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Faith in Schools: Religion, Education, and American Evangelicals in East Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • To Friends Here and There v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xi
  • 1: Introduction: Schools of Faith 1
  • Part I - Preparation in the United States 33
  • 2: One Hundred Fifty Years of Mission Work 35
  • 3: Using Anthropology for Christian Witness 65
  • Part II - Evangelism in East Africa 97
  • 4: Teaching English in Tanzania 99
  • 5: Planting Church Schools in Kenya 132
  • 6: School-Community Partnerships in Uganda 154
  • Part III - Implications 179
  • 7: A New Anthropological Ethnography of Religion and Education 181
  • Epilogue 193
  • Reference Matter 197
  • Notes 199
  • References 209
  • Index 225
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