Unofficial Ambassadors: American Military Families Overseas and the Cold War, 1946-1965

By Donna Alvah | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO THE
INTRODUCTION

1. Several examples include Frank Costigliola, “'Unceasing Pressure for Penetration': Gender, Pathology, and Emotion in George Kennan's Formation of the Cold War,” The Journal of American History 83 (March 1997): 1309–1339; Robert D. Dean, Imperial Brotherhood: Gender and the Making of Cold War Foreign Policy (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 2001); Cynthia Enloe, Bananas, Beaches, and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989), and Maneuvers: The International Politics of Militarizing Women's Lives (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2000); Kristin Hoganson, Fighting for American Manhood: How Gender Politics Provoked the Spanish-American and PhilippineAmerican Wars (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1998); Andrew J. Rotter, Comrades at Odds: The United States and India, 1947–1964 (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 2000); and Molly M. Wood, “Diplomatic Wives: The Politics of Domesticity and the 'Social Game' in the U.S. Foreign Service, 1905–1941,” Journal of Women's History 17, no. 2 (Summer 2005): 142–165.

2. Joan Wallach Scott, Gender and the Politics of History (New York: Columbia University Press, 1988), 2, 11, 32, 48.

3. Emily S. Rosenberg, “Gender,” The Journal of American History (June 1990): 116, 118– 119. Rosenberg encourages still another approach, the study of women in international development, to more fully comprehend global production and relations and women's roles in these (121– 123).

4. Joanne Meyerowitz, “Beyond the Feminine Mystique: A Reassessment of Postwar Mass Culture, 1946–1958,” in Not June Cleaver: Women and Gender in Postwar America, 1945– 1960, ed. Joanne Meyerowitz (Philadelphia: The University Press, 1994), 241.

5. Joseph S. Nye, Jr., Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics (New York: PublicAffairs, 2004), 5–9; see also Bound to Lead: The Changing Nature of American Power (n.p.: BasicBooks, 1990), and The Paradox of American Power: Why the World's Only Superpower Can't Go It Alone (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002).

6. Mary L. Dudziak, Cold War Civil Rights: Race and the Image of American Democracy (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000); Yukiko Koshiro, Trans-Pacific Racisms and the U.S. Occupation of Japan (New York: Columbia University Press, 1999); Brenda Gayle Plummer, “Brown Babies: Race, Gender, and Policy after World War II,” in Window on Freedom: Race, Civil Rights, and Foreign Affairs, 1945–1988 (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2003); Heide Fehrenbach, Race after Hitler: Black Occupation Children in Postwar Germany and America (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2005).

7. Charlotte Wolf, Garrison Community: A Study of an Overseas American Military Colony (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Publishing Corporation, 1969).

8. Martha Gravois, “Hot Dogs, Apple Pie and Wiener Schnitzel: Army Families in Germany (1946–1986)” (M.A. thesis, Shippensburg University, 1986); and “Military Families in Germany, 1946–1986: Why They Came and Why They Stay,” Parameters 16, no. 4 (Winter 1986): 58.

9. These include John Gimbel, A German Community under American Occupation: Marburg, 1945–52 (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1961); Johannes Kleinschmidt, Do Not Fraternize: die schwierigen Anfänge deutsch-amerikanischer Freundschaft, 1944–1949 (Trier: WVT Wissenschaftlicher Verlag, 1997); Dewey A. Browder, Americans in Post-World War II Germany: Teachers, Tinkers, Neighbors and Nuisances (Lewiston, N.Y.: The Edwin Mellen Press, 1998); John Willoughby, Remaking the Conquering Heroes: The Social and Geopolitical Impact of the Post-War American Occupation of Germany (New York: Palgrave, 2001); Maria Höhn, GIs and Fräuleins: The GermanAmerican Encounter in 1950s West Germany (Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 2002); and John P. Hawkins, Army of Hope, Army of Alienation: Culture and Contradiction in the American Army Communities of Cold War Germany (Westport, Conn.: Praeger, 2001).

10. Petra Goedde, GIs and Germans: Culture, Gender, and Foreign Relations, 1945–1949

-235-

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Unofficial Ambassadors: American Military Families Overseas and the Cold War, 1946-1965
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Going Overseas 14
  • 2: Unofficial Ambassadors 38
  • 3: A U.S. Lady's World 81
  • 4: “shoulder to Shoulder” with West Germans 131
  • 5: “dear Little Okinawa” 167
  • 6: Young Ambassadors 198
  • Conclusion 226
  • Notes 235
  • Bibliography 261
  • Index 273
  • About the Author 291
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