Unofficial Ambassadors: American Military Families Overseas and the Cold War, 1946-1965

By Donna Alvah | Go to book overview

Index
2001 terrorist attacks, 232
Acheson, Dean, 17–18
Adams, Alvadee and John (editors of U.S. Lady): on benefits of service families, 125; on harmony among diverse people, 106; Rockwell (George Lincoln) and, 94–95; on service wives' suitability for Peace Corps, 81–82
Adenauer, Konrad, 143
Adjutant General's Wives' Club (Heidelberg), 148
Adoptions by service families: of Asian children, 246n48; children's response to, 107; coverage in U.S. Lady, 106, 123; in Germany, 145–146; in Japan, 106; of mixed-race children, 146; multiple adoptions, 106; of nonwhite children by white parents, 106, 123; of orphanages/poor families, 49; personal participation in Cold War, 246n48; short story about, 106–107
Africa, family members of U.S. armed forces in, 1it
African Americans: desegregation of the armed forces, 121, 158; exclusion from certain areas abroad, 85; percent of enlistees in armed forces, 244n14; percent of officers in armed forces, 84; percent of servicemen overseas, 84; scrutiny of, 256n36; in West Germany, 157–158
Air Force. See United States Air Force
Akkerhuis, Gerard, 216, 218
Alfonte, Virginia Ferrell, 112
Allen, Dollie, 121
Allensbach Institute, 93
Allied Control Council, 47–48, 134
American good will, demonstrations of, 2, 48–49, 70–71, 136, 189, 232
American Nazi Party, 94
American Occupation Women's Voluntary Service, 78, 136
American Red Cross, 72
American sensitivity to foreigners, demonstrations of, 2, 51, 53, 75
American Way of Life: belief in its superiority, 6, 9, 83, 128, 157; service families as representatives of, 2
The American Way (Rockwell), 53, 54
American Women's Activities in Europe, 136
American Women's Club (Heidelberg), 150
American Women's Club (West Berlin), 103,145
“Ami, Don' t Go Home” (Holshouser), 179–180
Anderson, Robert, 163
Andrews, Jean, 97, 98
Anti-communism: Cold War, 2, 6, 39, 80, 132–133; democratization, 52–53; domestic anti-communism, 61; employment of domestic servants in Asia, 183; overseas bases, 46; postwar domestic revival, 61; service families, 2, 6, 39; service wives, 82
Armed Forces Radio Station, 128
Armed Services Committee of the House of Representatives, 169–170
Army. See United States Army
Army Information Digest (magazine), 46, 48, 132
Army Overseas Dependents School (Paris), 214, 215, 220
Arrington, Satomi, 218
Asia: employment of domestic servants in, 183; family members of U.S. armed forces in, lit

-273-

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Unofficial Ambassadors: American Military Families Overseas and the Cold War, 1946-1965
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Going Overseas 14
  • 2: Unofficial Ambassadors 38
  • 3: A U.S. Lady's World 81
  • 4: “shoulder to Shoulder” with West Germans 131
  • 5: “dear Little Okinawa” 167
  • 6: Young Ambassadors 198
  • Conclusion 226
  • Notes 235
  • Bibliography 261
  • Index 273
  • About the Author 291
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