We Are Not What We Seem: Black Nationalism and Class Struggle in the American Century

By Rod Bush | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I often felt lonely and isolated while working on this project over the last ten years, but the very attempt to communicate reinforces the profoundly social aspect of this experience. This act of communication draws upon a dizzying array of mentors, enablers, and supporters without which this effort would not have been possible. This number is much larger than I can mention here, but I would like to express my love and gratitude to some of the key people.

This work is dedicated to my family and to a beloved mentor who passed away last January. Terence K. Hopkins was a friend, mentor, and role model as a scholar, a writer, a teacher, and a human being. He always gave more than seemed humanly possible to any task. He worked diligently, tirelessly, and unremittingly with me to state my ideas clearly and fully, forcefully and carefully. We talked for hours and hours about the movements, the world-economy, and the need to understand the processes of the capitalist world-economy. We made plans to do joint work once this project was done. He made a profound mark upon those whom he advised, but the world does not know the intellectual impact of this man because he worked mostly through advising and teaching others, even his peers.

The first circle of support comes from my wife, my children, and my parents. First and foremost is my wife, my soulmate, and comrade, Melanie Bush. As a mentor and critic, as an intellectual companion without compare, she has been a singular inspiration. From our first meeting and eventual collaboration as militants, she has always been my role model. Her tireless energy and devotion to unselfish service and mentorship is a constant reminder of how humane we can all strive to be. Her personal and intellectual integrity and depth daily enriches my life and my scholarship. Over the course of this project she gave birth to our love child, Sarafina Fidelia, completed her own M.P.H. and completed the course work for a Ph.D. in anthropology. While doing all of this she

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