Tinker Belles and Evil Queens: The Walt Disney Company from the Inside Out

By Sean Griffin | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank a number of people for helping me in my work on this project. First and foremost, my appreciation to the faculty, staff and student body of the Critical Studies Department at the University of Southern California. While almost everyone there has influenced the final shape of this work in some fashion, I would like to especially thank Marsha Kinder, Lynn Spigel and Sandra Ball-Rokeach for their encouragement, involvement and thoughtful criticism during my writing. Joseph A. Boone and Rick Jewell were also key contributors to rounding out the research and theoretical concepts necessary for tackling this project, and Lee Stork provided enormous support and guidance throughout. From New York University Press, I am extremely indebted to Eric Zinner for his enthusiasm and his support. I also thank Dana Polan and the anonymous reader for NYU Press for their comments and suggestions.

Research entailed numerous areas, and everyone was extremely forthcoming. I especially wish to thank Ned Comstock and the rest of the staff at USC's Cinema-Television Library and Archive. I also must thank the many former and present employees of The Walt Disney Company who took the time to speak with me, particularly those members of the LEsbian And Gay United Employees, who welcomed me into their meetings and social events warmly and without reservation. Although not all of those interviewed are specifically quoted in this work, their comments profoundly influence many of the analyses presented throughout this work. My thanks also go to the ONE Institute for helping me find back issues of gay periodicals not usually collected by major universities and libraries. Without their initial help, it is doubtful that this project would have ever seen the light of day. Others who have contributed to this project include Eric Smoodin, Eric Freedman, Maureen Furniss and Animation Journal, and all the members of the Society for Animation Studies.

-vii-

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