Musical Imagination: U.S.-Colombian Identity and the Latin Music Boom

By Maria Elena Cepeda | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I was never anything but these two countries.

—Junot Díaz

As a U.S. Latina with a doctoral degree, I am acutely and at times painfully cognizant of my privileged status as a statistical anomaly. To this end, I write these words in recognition of the fact that this text and the years of preparation leading up to its publication would not have been the same without the critical support of many cherished mentors, colleagues, friends, and family. Primero que nada, I offer my thanks and appreciation to Frances R. Aparicio, whose intelligence, mentoring, and generosity not only initially convinced me to pursue my graduate studies at the University of Michigan but who also did much to keep me there, despite all of the obstacles. I can't thank you enough for your brilliant example, friendship, and willingness to advocate on behalf of myself and countless other junior Latina and Latino scholars. Warm thanks are also due to Margarita de la Vega-Hurtado, who supported me from the very beginning and who in the process became a true friend and a generous intellectual resource for todo lo colombiano, en particular todo lo costeno. In addition, I would like to extend a very sincere thank you to former Rackham Dean Earl Lewis of the University of Michigan for the fellowship that made my time in Miami possible and to Williams College for its generous logistical and financial support throughout this process.

My lifelong love of and fascination with Miami was only enhanced by the consideration of individuals like Michael Collier and Eduardo Gamarra of Florida International University, who allowed me to participate in one of the Colombian Studies Institute's inaugural projects, as well as Natalia Franco and John Britt Hunt, who kindly shared their scholarship on the Miami Colombian community. Thanks also to Jorge Caycedo for his warm guidance and his professional wisdom through some very difficult times. And to

-ix-

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