Musical Imagination: U.S.-Colombian Identity and the Latin Music Boom

By Maria Elena Cepeda | Go to book overview

4
Florecita rockera
Gender and Representation in Latin(o)
American Rock and Mainstream Media
Florecita rockeraLittle rock blossom
Tú te lo buscasteYou asked for it
Por despertar mi pasiónBy arousing my passion
Encendiste mi hogueraYou lit my fire
No tienes perdónThere's no forgiving you
Te pondre en una materaI'll put you in a flower pot

— Aterciopelados, “Florecita rockera”

Fresh-cut flowers, along with coffee, emeralds, and cocaine, figure among Colombia's principal exports. Therefore, it seems entirely suitable— though perhaps merely coincidental—that “Florecita rockera” (Little rock blossom), as sung by the lead singer of Aterciopelados, Andrea Echeverri, has emerged as one of the defining anthems of the Colombian rock movement. When read in isolation, “florecita” may well simply reference a primary cash crop; read in conjunction with “rockera” (female rocker), however, this flower assumes an entirely different meaning. Relying on lyrics heavy in plant and floral imagery juxtaposed against a punk/ska backdrop, “Florecita rockera” unites the seemingly disparate worlds of the stereotypically “feminine” and hard-core punk music.1 As evidenced in the song's opening verse, in which Echeverri inquires “Cómo echarte flores/ Si ères un jardin7.” (How can one give you compliments [literally, throw you flowers]/ If you're already a garden?”), “Florecita rockera'”s first-person narrative is replete with colloquial Colombian phrases that reference not only nature in its physical forms but also recall another, supposedly “natural” phenomenon: the gender dynamics underlying the (ostensibly heterosexual) mating ritual. “Florecita”“s first-person narrative voice, that of Echeverri, is notably a woman's voice, effectively leading us to question the perspective from which she performs. Initially, it

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