The Weight of Their Votes: Southern Women and Political Leverage in the 1920s

By Lorraine Gates Schuyler | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

After the long process of researching and writing this book, I am honored to have the opportunity to thank the many people who made this project possible. This is the part of the book I have long wanted to write.

First, I would like to thank the history department at the University of Virginia for its generous financial support of my graduate education in general and of this project as both a dissertation and a manuscript. Chuck McCurdy, as chair of the department, provided me with research and travel support at critical moments, for which I am truly grateful. Duke University, the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library Association, and the Virginia Historical Society also provided grants for research in their collections. A fellowship from the Miller Center of Public Affairs allowed me to focus an entire year on finishing my dissertation, with the added luxuries of an office and a wonderful community of scholars in the Fellowship Program.

While conducting the research for this project, I relied on the talent and assistance of countless archivists and librarians. I owe a special debt of gratitude to the archivist at Delta State University and to the helpful staff of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library. Lew Purifoy and the InterLibrary Loan staff at the University of Virginia's Alderman Library have been spectacularly helpful, persistently tracking down the obscure sources that I requested and, more than once, mailing them to me when I was on the road. Staff in the Geostat Lab showed extreme patience as they taught me how to code old electoral data, use SPSS, and make maps that pulled it all together. Two outstanding undergraduates, Kate Baylor and Anna KromeLukens, provided thorough research assistance.

At the University of Virginia, the Southern Seminar, the Twentieth Century Seminar, and the Miller Center of Public Affairs offered forums for me to share draft chapters of this project. The suggestions that were offered by scholars there encouraged me to improve the manuscript in ways that I would not have and saved me from many mistakes that I otherwise would have made. Skeptical audiences and generous co-panelists at meetings of the Southern Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, the Social Science History Association, the Miller Center of Public Affairs, and the Southern Association for Women Historians all helped to refine my arguments and bolster my evidence. I am especially grateful to Liette Gid-

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Weight of Their Votes: Southern Women and Political Leverage in the 1920s
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.