Ancient Muses: Archaeology and the Arts

By John H. Jameson; John E. Ehrenhard et al. | Go to book overview

18 Is Archaeology
Fiction?
Some Thoughts about Experimental
Ways of Communicating
Archaeological Processes to
the “External World”

Nicola Laneri

The real significance . . . is that the Bible again has apparently been
shown to be true, reliable, and accurate, down to the smallest historical
detail. Critics who claim that the Bible does not coincide with known
history and geography are again shown to be wrong once the physical
evidence begins to surface.

The account in the Bible is true, and the implications are incredible.

—from www.baseinstitute.org, emphasis added

One day during November 2000 I was watching a program on the NBC evening news concerning the rediscovery of the “real Mount Sinai” by two men, Bob Cornuke and William Larry, who belong to the Bible Archaeology Search and Exploration (BASE) Institute (figure 18.1). Cornuke, director of the institute, writes that “BASE exists to reaffirm the Bible as our reliable message of hope from God to mankind. We acknowledge it as our reliable standard of truth. Using the Bible and other historic sources, coupled with scholarly research supported by archaeological evidence, BASE endeavors to dispel the notion that the Bible is a collection of fables and legend” (from www.baseinstitute.org).

Bob Cornuke considers himself “an international explorer,” but he is also, and probably more importantly, a retired policeman and a member of his local SWAT team—in short, a person who has spent almost all of his life controlling the reliable truths of people's daily lives. The NBC news program showed

-179-

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