The Affect Effect: Dynamics of Emotion in Political Thinking and Behavior

By W. Russell Neuman; George E. Marcus et al. | Go to book overview

PART II
Micro Models

It should not surprise one that in a collection of scholarly contributions concerning emotion, political judgment, and behavior, the largest number come from scholars studying how emotions function in and among individuls. The six chapters in this part present a rich array of approaches and topics. We begin with the contribution from Cassino and Lodge. Their work explores the central assertion of Michael L. Spezio and Ralph Adolphs and, indeed, the work of many of the other contributors, namely, that emotional processing is intimately and unavoidably involved in the evaluative and decision-making processes that follow. Cassino and Lodge present a study that argues for the pervasive impact of emotion on memory. They place their study within the motivated reasoning approach, a tradition in political psychology that Lodge (Lodge and Taber 1997) helped develop. This view holds that emotion serves mainly to aid in securing motivational goals, and this leads to the cognitive consequences that such information processing is designed to achieve. Accuracy is rarely a dominant motivational goal; rather, emotion too often sets other motivational goals, such as seeking information that bolsters preexisting values or beliefs.

The chapter by MacKuen, Marcus, Neuman and Keele offers the most recent stage of evolution of one of the earliest theories in political science (Marcus 1988). The theory of affective intelligence offers a comprehensive account of the way in which emotional preconscious processing accounts for the flux in feeling states, the consequent ways in which conscious awareness is engaged and expressed, and the judgments and behaviors that follow. A number of key foundational claims are advanced by this theory; for example, the claim that emotions are the result of preconscious appraisals, a point that is also foundational to

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Affect Effect: Dynamics of Emotion in Political Thinking and Behavior
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 453

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.