The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue

By Matthew L. Jones | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Concerning those authors who speak of their works as “my book,”
“my commentary,” U+201 Cmy story,” and so forth, Mr. Pascal said that
they seem like well-established burghers, always with a
chez moi at
their lips. This excellent man added that they would do far better to
say: “our book,” “our commentary,” “our history,” and so forth,
since usually more of what is good in such works comes from others
than from themselves
.
M. de Vigneul-Marville, Melanges de littérature et d'histoire (1700)

This book began as a preface to a ridiculously grandiose project. Wise friends led me to pursue the preface on its own terms, guided me throughout, and made me recognize the merits of bringing it to a close, no matter how much I protested that some crucial piece of evidence still lurked on my shelves. A model advisor, generous reader, and good friend, Mario Biagioli has unstintingly offered me his insight and guidance in reading and improving many versions of my work. Ever since he warmly supported and directed my initial forays into the history of science, Peter Galison has taught me much about combining innovative methods with careful inquiry into technical practice. Many of my guiding ideas about early-modern science came in the course of a memorable year working with Simon Schaffer. Tom Conley steered me through the cartography of early-modern French literature. By introducing the long philosophical tradition of spiritual exercises to me, Arnold Davidson saved me from my parochialism; his intervention reoriented the project philosophically and historically.

Perceptive and copious comments from several referees helped me improve the style, argument, and evidence of the manuscript throughout. My thanks to Lorraine Daston and the anonymous referees, whose thoughtful care in responding to my work exemplifies the best of academic citizenship. Having agreed to read my dissertation at short notice, Dominico BertoloniMeli wrote an insightful commentary to which I often have returned. Many teachers, friends, and colleagues commented on chapters of the manuscript or on presentations of them, notably Peder Anker, Nick King, Bob Brain, Anne Davenport, Eric Ash, Heidi Voskuhl, Jamie Cohen-Cole, J. B. Shank, Cyrus Mody Lisbet Rausing, Abby Zanger, Everett Mendelson, Mary Terrall, Anthony Koliha, Michael Binard, and Peter Miller. David Kaiser

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Good Life in the Scientific Revolution: Descartes, Pascal, Leibniz, and the Cultivation of Virtue
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xv
  • A Note on Conventions xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Descartes 13
  • Chapter One - Geometry as Spiritual Exercise 15
  • Chapter Two - A Rhetorical History of Truth 55
  • Part II - Pascal 87
  • Chapter Three - Mathematical Liaisons 89
  • Chapter Four - The Anthropology of Disproportion 131
  • Part III - Leibniz 167
  • Chapter Five - Forms of Expression 169
  • Chapter Six - Seeing All at Once 229
  • Epilogue 267
  • Notes 271
  • Bibliography 329
  • Index 363
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 385

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.