The Passions of Christ in High-Medieval Thought: An Essay on Christological Development

By Kevin Madigan | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Special thanks to the National Endowment for the Humanities for a Prize Fellowship awarded in 2002–2003, without which the publication of this book would have been much delayed. I would like to thank my colleagues at Harvard Divinity School for their kind encouragement. Let me particularly thank Amy Hollywood and Sarah Coakley for having read through the entire manuscript before publication and for invaluable advice. I am grateful to Jon Levenson for his continuous support, intellectual companionship and wit. Portions of this book were drafted when I was on the faculty of Catholic Theological Union (CTU) for six happy years in Chicago. I wish to thank Don Senior, its omnicompetent president, for friendship and release time. To my many other friends at CTU, especially John Pawlikowski and Paul Wadell, I am grateful. I have benefitted greatly from the good humor and faithful friendship of John van Engen and David Burr. Many thanks to my research assistant, Zach Matus, for keeping me supplied with books with such good humor. Thanks too, to my faculty assistants over the past six years—Eric Unverzagt, Kristin Gunst and Kathy Lou—all of whom provided invaluable assistance with manuscript preparation. Thanks to Cynthia Read, my editor at Oxford University Press, and her very able assistants Theo Calderara and Julia TerMaat. My wife Stephanie Paulsell and daughter Amanda Madigan were a constant support and source of humor, the latter especially when wondering, at age 4, when I'd be coming home from the “Vidinity School.” I dedicate this book in gratitude and deep respect to my graduate school advisor and friend, Bernard McGinn.

-vii-

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