The Passions of Christ in High-Medieval Thought: An Essay on Christological Development

By Kevin Madigan | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER I

1. I agree with the most widely (if not unanimously) accepted version of the literary relationship between Mark, on the one hand, and Matthew and Luke on the other, which posits, essentially, that Mark was a major source for Matthew and Luke. Recently, other theories have been put forward. See, e.g., D. J. Neville, Mark's GospelPrior or Posterior? A Reappraisal of the Phenomenon of Order (London: Sheffield Academic Press, 2002).

2. The crucial clause οὐδέ ό υιός is missing in many Matthean mss. As Bruce Metzger has observed, “The omission of the words because of the doctrinal difficulty they present is more probable than their addition by assimilation to Mark. 13:32” (A Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament, 2nd ed. [Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft; United Bible Societies, 1994]), 51–52.

3. For discussion of the problematic implications of this category, see discussion in chapter 2, xx-xx.

4. Ed. Irena Backus, 2 vols. (Leiden: Brill, 1997).

5. See, e.g., Leo Elders, “Thomas Aquinas and the Fathers of the Church,” Reception of the Fathers, 337–366, esp. 341. Elders's 1997 essay reflects almost all of the views regarding Thomas's use of patristic authorities that have dominated the field for more than a century. Like many of Thomas's commentators, Elders asserts that Thomas is capable of “bridging the gap” (337) between patristic and medieval thought. What “bridging the gap” might entail Elders did not attempt to define with any philosophical rigor. He goes on to say that Thomas realizes that the fathers had different opinions on matters not de fide. Yet he does not seem to perceive that these opinions often touched on matters central to the faith, such as the Trinity

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