Cosmos, BIOS, Theos: Scientists Reflect on Science, God, and the Origins of the Universe, Life, and Homo Sapiens

By Roy Abraham Varghese; Henry Margenau | Go to book overview

8
A Divine Design: Some Questions on Origins
An Interview with Sir John Eccles (1982)
Born 27 January 1903
Ph.D. in natural sciences, Oxford University, 1929; Nobel Prize for Physiology/Medicine (shared with Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley), 1963; received the Nobel Prize with Hodgkin and Huxley “for their discoveries concerning the ionic mechanisms involved in excitation and inhibition in the peripheral and central portions of the nerve cell membrane”
Currently residing in Switzerland, with periodic lecture tours around the world
Works include Neurophysiological Basis of Mind,1953; The Self and Its Brain(with Sir Karl Popper), 1977; The Human Psyche,1980
Sir John Eccles on:
the origin of the universe: “… if you look at the whole evolutionary process from the Big Bang onwards—the evolution of the cosmos and the evolution of biological life—I have a feeling that it all seems to make sense. It was as if there was a purpose in it all … ”
the origin of life: “The total time of fifteen billion years is really the minimum we could have gotten for making all the elements, putting them into the dust of the cosmos, and getting it all swept up eventually in our solar system which does have all the essential elements for life”.
the origin of Homo sapiens: “… the conscious self is not in the Darwinian evolutionary process at all. I think it is a divine creation”.
God: “If I consider reality as I experience it, the primary experience I have is of my own existence as a unique self-conscious being which I believe is God-created”.

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