Cosmos, BIOS, Theos: Scientists Reflect on Science, God, and the Origins of the Universe, Life, and Homo Sapiens

By Roy Abraham Varghese; Henry Margenau | Go to book overview

Concluding Comment

Professor H. D. Lewis

I think we are now at the stage where it is better for other contributors to come in. The main thing for me in Professor Meynell's observations is the difficulty he finds (and which others share) in making any intelligible statement about (or making any sense of) a reality alleged to be beyond anything we can speak of or understand in the terms we use to refer to normal finite reality. I have little to add to what I have said on this issue earlier. The ultimate incomprehensibility of God in himself, and the essential mystery of the way he works in itself, is stressed in many religious scriptures, including the Bible in many parts. That we feel impelled, by finite experience and the finite world, to recognize the necessity of such reality is not ruled out by the inevitable failure to say more about it in itself. To amplify this would be to repeat much that I have already said in my initial article. But the ultimate mystery for us of the being of God in himself does not require us to rest with this and affirm nothing further in other allusive ways. I have myself stressed the analogy of our awareness of one another, and this seems to me to take proper note of the place of “intelligent human agency” in our understanding of God and his ways, so far as this is possible for us. We must not make such analogies final but allow them to provide a genuine clue to the things we say about divine intervention and concern. How this proceeds is what I have considered all too briefly in the closing part of my paper, and I shall return to it as a central religious issue in itself elsewhere. I do so in part in my contribution to the volume in honor of Professor Ivor Leclerc. But I must say here than the inability to speak of God in himself in specific and final human terms, and with our own full understanding, is not an insurmountable difficulty for those who claim to have impressive specific knowledge of God in other ways than the insight, allegedly required, which would put us in some ways at the level of God. We are finite creatures, but I see nothing preposterous in the notion that God can communicate with us, at our level of

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