The Miracles of St. John Capistran

By Stanko Andrić | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Capistran as a living miracle-worker

One of the basic differences between the in vita and post mortem miracles is the active role assumed by the saint in the first group; while post mortem miracles are essentially impersonal (even when the visions had by the miraculés introduce the saint's specter into the story), living saints are able to better control the application of their exceptional power and to choose, at least to some extent, the beneficiaries and the forms, times, and places of their interventions.1 The in vita miracles thus deserve our attention since they can reveal something of the saint's own attitudes toward the working of miracles, while additionally this double (in vita and post mortem) perspective can furnish some interesting comparisons and contrasts.

It is perhaps an exaggeration to affirm that in vita miracles tend to be “dangerous for ecclesiastical authorities”,2 but their status is clearly more problematic than that of posthumous miracles. Medieval canon law considered an authentic and complete sanctity as bipartite, involving two equivalent elements: the saintly way of life (mores) and miracles (signa). But whereas the first could only manifest itself during this life, the latter was primarily to be expected after the saint's death (Kleinberg 1992, 27). While miracles are considered a sign and consequence of one's saintly life, the sanctity of a living person is always a fragile thing. In life the gift of miracles may celebrate one's virtues, but it needs to be constantly merited with these same virtues. This interdependency of virtues and the domination of the world through miracles was finely formulated by Nicholas of Fara: “it is good and justified that everything obeys him, who always obeyed his Lord”.3 After death this two-way bond simplifies, and miracles then become not only welcome but even necessary as evidence of one's past saintly life (cf. Barone

-193-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Miracles of St. John Capistran
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 454

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.