Missions and Empire

By Norman Etherington; Roger Louis | Go to book overview

12
Anthropology

PATRICK HARRIES

'Anthropology was born of the marriage of foreign missions and modern science,' wrote W. C. Willoughby confidently in 1913.1 Edwin Smith, another leading missionary anthropologist, repeated this assertion eleven years later. 'Social anthropology might almost be claimed as a missionary science,' he declared, 'First, on account of its great utility to missionaries, and second, because the material upon which it is built has so largely been gathered by them.'2 When Smith wrote these lines, missionaries' sturdy tribal monographs lined the shelves of the new university departments of social anthropology, their articles Filled a range of journals, and they were about to play a leading role in the funding and organization of the new discipline.3 Yet within ten years the age of the missionary anthropologist was in decline and his, rather than her, contribution to the discipline quickly faded. This chapter explores the emergence and decline of missionary contributions to anthropology.


Missionaries as Commentators on Indigenous Society

Missionaries contributed some of the earliest works of anthropology, ranging from Jean de Léry's Histoire d'un voyage en terre du Brésil (1578), which Claude Lévi-Strauss described as the First work of ethnography, to the classics of François-Xavier de Charlevoix and Jean-Marie Lafitau, Jesuit missionaries in early eighteenth-century Canada. European philosophers turned to such missionary texts to Find evidence in support of their explanations for such phenomena as the origins of language or the development of private property. Missionaries were obliged to become skilled propagandists

1 W. C. Willoughby, review of Life of a South African Tribe, IRM (1913), p. 588.

2 E. W. Smith, 'Social Anthropology and Mission Work', IRM XIII (1924), p. 518.

3 Henk J. van Rinsum, 'Edwin W. Smith and his “Raw Material”: Texts of a Missionary and
Ethnographer in Context', Anthropos, XCIV (1999), pp. 351–80.

-238-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Missions and Empire
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • Abbreviations x
  • List of Contributors xi
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: Prelude: the Christianizing of British America 19
  • 3: An Overview,1700–1914 40
  • 4: Humanitarians and White Settlers in the Nineteenth Century 64
  • 5: Where the Missionary Frontier Ran Ahead of Empire 86
  • 6: Christian Missions and the Raj 107
  • 7: New Christians as Evangelists 132
  • 8: 'trained to Tell the Truth': Missionaries, Converts, and Narration 153
  • 9: Women and Cultural Exchanges 173
  • 10: Language 194
  • 11: New Religious Movements 216
  • 12: Anthropology 238
  • 13: Education and Medicine 261
  • 14: Decolonization 285
  • Index 307
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 332

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.