Mutiny at Fort Jackson: The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans

By Michael D. Plerson | Go to book overview

acknowledgments

In the course of writing this book, I have enjoyed the help and encourage- ment of a great many people. They may not have saved me from all of my errors, but they have certainly made this a better work of history than it would have been without their help.

Essential support has come from institutions. I am grateful to several groups for funding the archival research trips that underlie this work. In particular, I am indebted to the Lowell National Historical Park for making me its Scholar in the City in 2003 and to the Andersonville National Histor- ical Site for one of its Prisoner of War Research Grants. I have also bene- fited from two travel grants from the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, including an award from the College of Fine Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences and a Joseph P. Healey Research Grant. I have also enjoyed sup- port from two fine History Department chairmen while working on this book; Charles Carroll and Joseph Lipchitz not only have come through with financial support but also have created a relaxed department culture that enables people to concentrate on their teaching and research.

The University of Massachusetts, Lowell, has also supported the re- search for this book through two Faculty-Student Collaborative Research Seed Grants. These grants enabled me to work with two wonderful under- graduates, Megan Williams and Katherine Smith. Both did extensive and demanding research in the newspapers of the period, and citations to periodicals throughout this book usually reflect their work. I appreciate their careful scholarship and enthusiasm. My thanks also to Marvin Stick, Robert Tuholski, and the other members of the Teaching and Learning Grant Task Force for approving my applications.

I would like to thank the Massachusetts Historical Society for graciously allowing me to use material here that previously appeared in the Mas- sachusetts Historical Review.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mutiny at Fort Jackson: The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.