The Age of Pericles: A History of the Politics and Arts of Greece from the Persian to the Peloponnesian War - Vol. 2

By William Watkiss Lloyd | Go to book overview

CHAPTER LX.
THE REVOLT OF POTIDAEA.--ATHENIAN EXPEDITION AND VICTORY.
--THE CITY INVESTED.--THE DORIAN WAR INEVITABLE.
B.C. 432, Autumn; Ol. 87. 1.

FOILED as they were in their great attempt the Corinthians did not make for home without seizing an opportunity by the way to injure Corcyra and defy Athens, by treacherously seizing Anactorion at the mouth of the Ambracian gulf,--a town in which Corcyra had the same common interest with them as at Epidamnus,--and consigning it to Corinthian occupants. Of their captives in the sea-fight they sold eight hundred who were slaves;--two hundred and fifty, among whom were some principal men of the aristocratical party, they retained as prisoners and treated with much consideration in the hope of one day employing their intervention for the recovery of influence at Corcyra. The restoration of these captives to their native city at a later date for a fictitious ransom, led to one of the bloodiest conflicts of faction that stain Hellenic annals;--first fruit in this kind of the outbreak of Lacedaemonian and Athenian rivalry, and taken by Thucydides as occasion for that impressive summary of the demoralising influences of the war, after which he dispenses with intruding moral judgments on any particular actions and incidents whatever, however revolting and 1atrocious.

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1
Thuc. iii. 81-3.

-340-

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