Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America

By Jane E. Schultz | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Pensioning Women

Are we not all soldiers?

—Anna L. Beers to Mary Ann Bickerdyke, October 22,1886

She sought no soft place, but wherever her regiment went she went, often marching on foot and camping without tent on the field. She was always present where most needed, and to the suffering, whether “Yank” or “Grayback,” it made no difference.… I have seen her face a battery without flinching, while a man took refuge behind her to avoid the flying fragments of bursting shells. Of all the men and women who volunteered to serve their country during the late war, not one is more deserving of reward.

—Testimony of Gilman Marston on behalf of Harriet Patience Dame, March 15,1884

When I worked in Arm[or]y Square hospital D.C. I was quite young. … My stepfather also worked there. His name was Samuel Taylor. He looked after me and I suppose my name was registered as Martha Taylor or Martha Lewis as they use [sic] to call me by Taylor and sometimes Lewis. I lived with a family by the name of Lewis before I went to the hospital to work but my mo[t]her [sic] name was Smith.

—Pension affidavit of Martha Smith Reed, June 30, 1896

-183-

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Women at the Front: Hospital Workers in Civil War America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Figures ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - On Duty 9
  • Chapter One - Women at the Front 11
  • Chapter Two - Getting to the Hospital 45
  • Chapter Three - Adjusting to Hospital Life 73
  • Chapter Four - Coming into Their Own 107
  • Part Two - The Legacy of War Work 143
  • Chapter Five - After the War 145
  • Chapter Six - Pensioning Women 183
  • Chapter Seven - Memory and the Triumphal Narrative 211
  • Appendix. a Note on Historiography 247
  • Notes 253
  • Bibliography 315
  • Index 343
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