Visions and Divisions: American Immigration Literature, 1870-1930

By Tim Prchal; Tony Trigilio | Go to book overview

Visions
AND DIVISIONS
AMERICAN IMMIGRATION LITERATURE,
1870–1930

EDITED AND WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY

Tim Prchal and Tony Trigilio

RUTGERS UNIVERSITY PRESS

NEW BRUNSWICK, NEW JERSEY, AND LONDON

-iii-

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Visions and Divisions: American Immigration Literature, 1870-1930
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Chronology ix
  • Introduction: The Literature of the New Chill xiii
  • A Note on the Text xxi
  • Part I - The Restriction/Open Door Debate 1
  • Text of the Chinese Exclusion Act 7
  • The New Colossus 11
  • Unguarded Gates 12
  • Twelve: Hundred More 14
  • John Chinaman in New York 16
  • Poems of Angel Island 18
  • Songs of Gold Mountain 20
  • The Biography of a Chinaman 21
  • Veronika and the Angelinos 30
  • What Is an American? the Suicide of the Anglo-American 39
  • Don't Bite the Hand That's Feeding You 47
  • The Promised Land 49
  • The Americanization of Roll-Down Joe 57
  • Mother America 65
  • Alma Mater: The Immigrant at Columbia 67
  • Part II - The Assimilation Debate 69
  • True Americanism 75
  • Ellis Island 85
  • The Alien 86
  • Moses 90
  • Old China 91
  • Songs of Gold Mountain 92
  • The Lie 93
  • A Great Man 110
  • The Wisdom of the New 119
  • The Foreigner 135
  • America 138
  • Poem Not Available 139
  • A Simple Act of Piety 143
  • I Dreamt I Was a Donkey-Boy Again 158
  • On Being Black 160
  • A Slavic Oklahoman 164
  • Part III - The Melting Pot Debate 171
  • Americanization 177
  • The Melting Pot 180
  • The Argentines, the Portuguese, and the Greeks 181
  • Sweet Burning Incense 183
  • Salvatore Schneider—a Story of New York 190
  • Uncle Wellington's Wives 199
  • The Apostate of Chego-Chegg 224
  • Maggie's Minstrel 239
  • The Alien in the Melting Pot 250
  • Chinaman, Laundryman 251
  • Rickshaw Boy 254
  • A Yellow Man and a White 257
  • The Old Lamp 268
  • Happiness 277
  • Part IV - The Cultural Pluralism Debate 279
  • Democracy versus the Melting-Pot: A Study of American Nationality 284
  • Trans-National America 306
  • Introduction 319
  • Foreign Country 320
  • Paderewski 321
  • A Polish Girl 322
  • The Island of Desire 323
  • The Greenhorn in America 332
  • Songs of Gold Mountain 340
  • Unconverted 342
  • Kalaun, the Elephant Trainer 346
  • The Tooth of Antar 355
  • H.R.H. the Prince of Hester Street 364
  • Sources 377
  • About the Editors 381
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