American Cinema of the 1970s: Themes and Variations

By Lester D. Friedman | Go to book overview

TIMELINE
The 1970s
1970
7 JANUARYEgypt, Libya, Algeria, and Iraq sign agreement prefiguring OPEC.
10 APRILPaul McCartney leaves the Beatles.
22 APRILCelebration of the first Earth Day.
4 MAYFour students are killed by National Guardsmen at Kent State University.
15 MAYTwo students are killed by police at Jackson State University.
3 NOVEMBERPresident Richard Nixon coins the term “silent majority.”
1971
12 JANUARY“All in the Family” debuts on CBS.
29 MARCHLt. William Calley is found guilty of murdering twenty-two civilians at My Lai, Vietnam.
20 APRILThe U.S. Supreme Court in Swann v. Charlotte Mecklenburg Board of Education establishes that the preservation of neighborhood schools no longer justifies racial imbalance.
13 JUNEThe Pentagon Papers are published by the New York Times.
25 JULYThe Twenty-sixth Amendment is ratified, lowering the voting age to eighteen.
9 SEPTEMBERA prison riot at Attica State Correctional facility in New York results in forty-two deaths.
20 DECEMBERThe feminist magazine Ms. premieres.
1972
1 JANUARYAll cigarette advertising is banned from television.
7 FEBRUARYPresident Richard Nixon visits China.
15 MARCHAlabama governor George Wallace is shot while campaigning in Maryland's presidential primary.
17 JUNEFive men are arrested at the Watergate Office Building for breaking into Democratic National Committee headquarters.
5 SEPTEMBERAt the Summer Olympics in Munich, eleven Israeli athletes and coaches are killed by terrorists.

-xi-

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