Feminism and Renaissance Studies

By Lorna Hutson | Go to book overview

Bibliography

The following bibliography does not pretend to be comprehensive, and the categories into which it is divided are meant to be helpful rather than discrete. Where an interdisciplinary collection has been cited, the essays in it have not been given individual entries, so the reader is advised that a collection which falls under the heading (for example) of 'Sexuality and the Body' may nevertheless contain essays on literature or art, and vice versa.


Literature and Humanist Learning

Beilin, Elaine, Redeeming Eve: Women Writers of the English Renaissance (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987).

Benson, Pamela Joseph, The Invention of the Renaissance Woman: The Challenge of Female Independence in the Literature and Thought of Italy andEngland(University Park: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1992).

Brant, Clare, and Purkiss, Diane (eds.), Women, Texts and Histories, 1575-1760 (London: Routledge, 1992).

Chedgzoy, Kate, Hansen, Melanie, and Trill, Suzanne (eds.), Voicing Women: Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern Writing (Keele: Keele University Press, 1996).

Ezell, Margaret, The Patriarch's Wife: Literary Evidence and the History of the Family (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987).

Ferguson, Margaret, Quilligan, Maureen, and Vickers, Nancy (eds.), Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986).

Harvey, Elizabeth, Ventriloquized Voices: Feminist Theory and English Renaissance Texts(London: Routledge, 1992).

Henderson, Katherine Usher, and McManus, Barbara F. (eds.), Half Humankind: Contexts and Texts of the Controversy about Women in England, 1540-1640 (Urbana and Chicago: University of Illinois Press, 1985).

Hendricks, Margo, and Parker, Patricia (eds.), Women, “Race” and Writing in the Early Modern Period (London: Routledge, 1994).

Hobby, Elaine, Virtue of Necessity: Englishwomen's Writings 1646-1688 (London: Virago Press, 1988).

Hull, Suzanne W., Chaste, Silent and Obedient: English Books for Women, 1475-1640 (San Marino, Calif.: Huntington Library, 1982).

Hutson, Lorna, The Usurer's Daughter: Male Friendship and Fictions of Women in Sixteenth Century England (London: Routledge, 1994).

Jardine, Lisa, Still Harping on Daughters: Women and Drama in the Age of Shakespeare (Hassocks, Sussex: Harvester Press, 1983).

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Feminism and Renaissance Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Notes on Contributors vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I - Humanism After Feminism 19
  • 1: Did Women Have a Renaissance? 21
  • 2: Women Humanists 48
  • 3: The Housewife and the Humanists 82
  • 4: The Tenth Muse 106
  • Part II - Historicizing Femininity 125
  • 5: The Notion of Woman in Medicine, Anatomy, and Physiology 127
  • 6: Women on Top 156
  • 7: The 'Cruel Mother' 186
  • 8: Witchcraft and Fantasy in Early Modern Germany 203
  • Part III 231
  • 9: Diana Described 233
  • 10: Literary Fat Ladies and the Generation of the Text 249
  • 11: Margaret Cavendish and the Romance of Contract 286
  • 12: Surprising Fame 317
  • Part IV - Women's Agency 337
  • 13: Women on Top in the Pamphlet Literature of the English Revolution 339
  • 14: La Donnesca Mano 373
  • 15: Guilds, Male Bonding and Women's Work in Early Modern Germany 412
  • 16: Language, Power, and the Law 428
  • 17: Finding a Voice 450
  • Bibliography 468
  • Index 475
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