Elements of War Crimes under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court: Sources and Commentary

By Knut Dörmann; Louise Doswald-Beck et al. | Go to book overview

Foreword by Dr Jakob Kellenberger
President of the International Committee of the Red Cross

Under the regime of the 1949 Geneva Conventions and the 1977 Additional Protocols thereto, States undertook to enact any legislation necessary to provide effective penal sanctions for persons committing, or ordering to be committed, grave breaches of the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols as defined in these instruments of international humanitarian law. More specifically, they incurred the obligation to search for persons alleged to have committed, or to have ordered to be committed, such grave breaches, and to bring such persons, regardless of their nationality, before their own courts. They may also, if they prefer, hand such persons over for trial to another High Contracting Party. In addition, States agreed to take measures necessary for the suppression of all acts contrary to the provisions of the Conventions and Protocols other than grave breaches.

The decision to lay down specific rules on the penal repression of serious violations of international humanitarian law was founded on the conviction that a law which is not backed up by sanctions quickly loses its credibility. Those who drafted the Geneva Conventions and Additional Protocols felt that penal repression could best be ensured on the national level, leaving the primary responsibility of defining and setting up an appropriate system to national authorities. Nevertheless, ever since the founding of the United Nations, and especially in view of the trials that took place after the Second World War, there has been an ongoing debate on the need to create a permanent international criminal court competent to try international crimes, including serious violations of international humanitarian law. Despite early enthusiasm, attempts to achieve this aim slowed down considerably and were even suspended, notably owing to the difficult political situation during the Cold War. After the Cold War came to an end, discussions on the issue gained new momentum.

The tragic events that took place in the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda, involving extremely serious violations of international humanitarian law,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elements of War Crimes under the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court: Sources and Commentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 524

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.