A Richer Heritage: Historic Preservation in the Twenty-First Century

By Robert E. Stipe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE
Private Sector Involvement
in Historic Preservation

KATHRYN WELCH HOWE

In 1973 the American Institute of Architects (AIA) published a full-page advertisement featuring Boston's 1867 Old City Hall with a caption that read, “The Most Promising Trend in Modern Architecture.” At the time, Old City Hall and Ghiradelli Square in San Francisco were two of a handful of successful commercial adaptive use projects nationally. Although teasing at the time, the AIA ad proved to profoundly predictive of the shift that was about to occur in real estate development and historic preservation.

Within a thirty-year period, the number of adaptive use and commercial rehabilitation projects has grown from a few high-risk, hard-fought ventures undertaken by developers who had both the resources and the passion to chance an uncertain market response into a multibillion-dollar business in which nearly every real estate entity participates. The realization that making economic use of historic buildings is an effective preservation solution and, frequently, a financially and politically constructive way to create housing, offices, industrial space, and so forth has caused preservation and real estate interests to find common ground. The National Park Service and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), both agencies responsible for administering investment tax credits for rehabilitation, estimate that more than $21 billion has been invested in historic properties since the passage of the first investment tax credit program in 1976.

The growth of private sector involvement and investment in historic preservation has occurred in parallel with a changing cultural ethos toward urban life and historical continuity in the United States. This shift in the cultural climate has been reinforced by favorable public policy initiatives, tax incentives, funding programs, innovative development projects, and a positive market response.

The preservation movement itself has turned increasingly from a regulatory approach to more of a market-driven reality. Although the use of regulatory tools such as landmark and historic district ordinances and environmental quality legislation will remain the backbone of protecting historic properties

-279-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Richer Heritage: Historic Preservation in the Twenty-First Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 570

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.