The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy

By Adrienne Mayor | Go to book overview

3
Education of a Young Hero

THEY mounted the boy on the wide back of the high-strung stallion. Whirling and bucking, the horse galloped away with the little rider gripping the reins and his child-size javelin. ὰe prince was only ten, but husky and tall for his age. He'd been riding horses since age five. But this steed, fresh from the high pastures of Cappadocia, was not yet broken. As the horse raced across the field, Mithradates seemed in peril of being thrown—but somehow he hung

Fig. 3.1. Small boy on a high-spirited horse, life-size Hellenistic bronze
sculpture from time of Mithradates, ca. 150–125 BC. National Archaeological
Museum, Athens, Greece. Vanni/Art Resource, NY.

-43-

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The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Dramatis Personae xv
  • Time Line xix
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Kill ὰem All, and Let the Gods Sort ὰem Out 13
  • 2: A Savior is Born in a Castle by the Sea 27
  • 3: Education of a Young Hero 43
  • 4: ὰe Lost Boys 73
  • 5: Return of the King 96
  • 6: Storm Clouds 123
  • 7: Victory 147
  • 8: Terror 169
  • 9: Battle for Greece 188
  • 10: Killers' Kiss 214
  • 11: Living like a King 236
  • 12: Falling Star 262
  • 13: Renegade Kings 288
  • 14: End Game 315
  • 15: In the Tower 347
  • Appendix One - Mythic Hero or Deviant Personality? 371
  • Appendix Two - Mithradates' Aἀerlife in the Arts and Popular Culture 377
  • Notes 381
  • Bibliography 421
  • Index 435
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