Taxation and Gender Equity: A Comparative Analysis of Direct and Indirect Taxes in Developing and Developed Countries

By Caren Grown; Imraan Valodia | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book is the result of a two-and-a-half-year project which examined the gender dimensions of tax policies and tax reforms in eight countries: Argentina, Ghana, India, Mexico, Morocco, South Africa, Uganda and the United Kingdom. The project emerged from discussions at the workshops and international conferences of the Gender and Macroeconomics International Working Group (GEMIWG), organized at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, in 2004 and 2005, of which several authors are members. It grew to include individuals and institutions from several countries and policy and academic networks.

The project had three goals: (1) to advance understanding of the gender impacts of tax policies and tax reforms in countries at various levels of development; (2) to engender and improve current tools and techniques for analysing tax policies and reforms; and (3) to influence tax policy-makers in the focus countries and internationally. Undertaking the work involved multiple expertise and experiences; within each country, a project team was constituted, comprised of public finance or development economists, feminist economists, lawyers, and political scientists. The institutional partners in each country are:

ArgentinaCentro Interdisplinario para el Estudio de Políticas Publicas (CIEPP – Interdisciplinary Centre for the Study of Public Policies)
GhanaInstitute for Statistical, Social and Economic Research (ISSER), University of Ghana
IndiaNational Institute for Public Finance Policy (NIPFP)
MexicoEquidad de Género: Ciudadana, Trabajo y Familia A.C. (Equidad)
MoroccoRawabit Association
South AfricaSchool of Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal
UgandaEconomic Policy Research Centre (EPRC), Makerere University
United KingdomOpen University

-xxiii-

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